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Table 4 Health-seeking behaviors and bite severity

From: Snakebite victim profiles and treatment-seeking behaviors in two regions of Kenya: results from a health demographic surveillance system

  [ALL] Minor outcome Severe outcome OR [95% CI] p
N = 392 N = 310 N = 82
Treated at formal facility 199 (50.8%) 152 (49.0%) 47 (57.3%) 1.39 [0.85; 2.29] 0.185
Treated by traditional healer 209 (53.3%) 146 (47.1%) 63 (76.8%) 3.69 [2.14; 6.63] <0.001
Formal treatment only 127 (32.4%) 112 (36.1%) 15 (18.3%) 0.40 [0.21; 0.72] 0.002
Traditional healer only 137 (34.9%) 106 (34.2%) 31 (37.8%) 1.17 [0.70; 1.93] 0.542
Both formal and traditional 72 (18.4%) 40 (12.9%) 32 (39.0%) 4.30 [2.46; 7.51] <0.001
Did not seek treatment 56 (14.3%) 52 (16.8%) 4 (4.88%) 0.26 [0.08; 0.67] 0.003
Length of time post-bite
      Same day 153 (77.3%) 126 (83.4%) 27 (57.4%) Ref. Ref.
      Following day 35 (17.7%) 20 (13.2%) 15 (31.9%) 3.47 [1.56; 7.70] 0.003
      2–3 days after the bite 7 (3.54%) 4 (2.65%) 3 (6.38%) 3.50 [0.61; 17.7] 0.146
      Within a week later 3 (1.52%) 1 (0.66%) 2 (4.26%) 8.61 [0.67; 277] 0.095
  1. Any bite which resulted in paralysis, permanent injury or death was considered to be a case of severe envenoming (“severe outcome”). Bite severity was also assessed for gender, age and reported snake species