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Table 1 Distribution of S. aureus isolates

From: Staphylococcus aureus with inducible clindamycin resistance and methicillin resistance in a tertiary hospital in Nepal

  Culture positive (%) Gram-positive bacteria (%) S. aureus (%) MRSA (%)
Clinical specimen
 Urine (n = 859) 225 (26.0%) 22 (9.8%) 8 (3.5%) 3 (37.5)
 Pus (n = 52) 41 (78.8%) 32 (78.5%) 16 (39.2%) 8 (50%)
 Blood (n = 50) 21 (42%) 9 (42.9%) 4 (19.1%) 1 (25%)
 Sputum (n = 41) 23 (56.1%) 14 (60.9%) 6 (26.1%) 2 (33.3%)
 *Body fluids (n = 25) 17 (68.0%) 5 (29.41%) 4 (23.5%) 1 (25%)
Hospital care for patients
 Outpatient care (n = 752) 215 (28.5%) 49 (22.8%) 21 (9.8%) 8(38.0%)
 Inpatient care (n = 275) 107 (38.9%) 33 (12%) 17 (15.8%) 7 (41.1%)
Sex of patients
 Male (n = 400) 109 (27.3%) 36 (33.0%) 18 (16.5%) 9 (50%)
 Female (n = 627) 212 (33.81%) 46 (21.7%) 20 (9.4%) 6 (30%)
 Total (n = 1027) 321 (31.3%) 82 (25.5%) 38 (11.8%) 15 (39.4%)
  1. S. aureus; *body fluids = CSF, synovial fluid, pleural fluid, throat swabs, vaginal swabs; percentage calculated on respective row total of preceding columnsIn susceptibility testing, all isolates of S. aureus were susceptible to vancomycin and 33 (86.8%) were susceptible to amikacin. All isolates were resistant to penicillin-G and ampicillin (Table 2). Also, 25 (67.5%) of S. aureus were MDR. Of 38 S. aureus, 19 (50%) were screened as MRSA, of which, 15 (39.4%) were confirmed MRSA phenotypically
  2. MRSA methicillin-resistant